Home » League of Nations People: Woodrow Wilson, Fridtjof Nansen, Maxim Litvinov, Nitobe Inaz , Nicolae Petrescu-Comnen, Edward M. House by Books LLC
League of Nations People: Woodrow Wilson, Fridtjof Nansen, Maxim Litvinov, Nitobe Inaz , Nicolae Petrescu-Comnen, Edward M. House Books LLC

League of Nations People: Woodrow Wilson, Fridtjof Nansen, Maxim Litvinov, Nitobe Inaz , Nicolae Petrescu-Comnen, Edward M. House

Books LLC

Published August 16th 2011
ISBN : 9781156677629
Paperback
40 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 39. Chapters: Woodrow Wilson, Fridtjof Nansen, Maxim Litvinov, Nitobe Inaz?, Nicolae Petrescu-Comnen, Edward M. House, James Grover McDonald, William Joseph Jordan, Peter Martin Anker, Jacob S. Worm-M ller, Ishii Kikujir?, Irreconcilables, Carl Jacob Burckhardt, Jos Manuel Cortina, Stefan Lux, Alexander Loveday, Leaders of the League of Nations, G. H. Mair, Cosme de la Torriente y Peraza, Albert Dufour-Feronce. Excerpt: Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 - February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States, from 1913 to 1921. A leader of the Progressive Movement, he served as President of Princeton University from 1902 to 1910, and then as the Governor of New Jersey from 1911 to 1913. With Progressive (Bull Moose) Party candidate Theodore Roosevelt and Republican nominee William Howard Taft dividing the Republican Party vote, Wilson was elected President as a Democrat in 1912. Like his arch-rival Republican Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Wilson held a Ph.D. degree-the only U.S. President to earn one. In his first term as President, Wilson persuaded a Democratic Congress to pass major progressive reforms including the Federal Reserve Act, Federal Trade Commission Act, the Clayton Antitrust Act, the Federal Farm Loan Act and an income tax. Wilson brought many white Southerners into his administration, and tolerated their expansion of segregation in many federal agencies. Narrowly re-elected in 1916, he had full control of American entry into World War I, and his second term centered on World War I and the subsequent peace treaty negotiations in Paris. He based his re-election campaign around the slogan, He kept us out of war, but U.S. neutrality was challenged in early 1917 when the German government began unrestricted submarine warfare despite repeated strong warnings. In April 1917, Wilson asked Congress to decl...